section.io compared to Leaseweb

On this page you can find an overview of the features and pricing of section.io and Leaseweb. We hope this helps you compare these two Content Delivery Networks. You can find additional tips that help you select the right CDN here.

Fully supported Partially supported Additional costs Not supported Unknown
Features section.io Leaseweb
PoPs 22 11
Purge All Fully supported Fully supported
Instant Purge Fully supported Partially supported
Control panel Fully supported Fully supported
Origin Push Not supported Fully supported
Origin Pull Fully supported Fully supported
Origin Shield Unknown Fully supported
GZIP Compression Fully supported Fully supported
Custom Rules Unknown Fully supported
HTTP/2 Protocol Fully supported Not supported
SPDY Protocol Not supported Unknown
Raw Access Logs Fully supported Fully supported
Real time statistics Fully supported Fully supported
Online signup Fully supported Not supported
API Purge, Statistics, Configuration Management Purge, Statistics, Configuration Management
Custom CNAMEs Fully supported Unknown
Shared SSL Certificates Fully supported Fully supported
Custom SSL Certificates Unknown Additional costs
Wildcard SSL Certificates Unknown Additional costs
Support Email support Email support
Video On Demand (VoD) Not supported Fully supported
RTMP Streaming Not supported Not supported
Multiple CDNs Not supported Not supported
CDN balancing tech Not supported Not supported
Storage Not supported Additional costs

Pricing section.io vs Leaseweb

section.io Leaseweb
Global flat fee N/A N/A
NA/EU Traffic (low volume) N/A $0.049 per GB for commitment below 50TB
NA/EU Traffic (high volume) N/A $0.006 per GB for commitments above 3PB
APAC Traffic N/A $0.049 per GB for low volume, $0.038 for high volume
LATAM Traffic N/A N/A
Extra costs N/A Additional costs for requests after the first 500 million:

  • $0.95 per million requests

SECTION.IO Description

Section.io is a “delivery platform created by developers for developers”. The Australian company was founded in 2015 by Stewart McGrath and Daniel Bartholomew, and developed by the team behind Squixa - a web performance acceleration company with multi-CDN. Squixa has since been renamed and made part of section.io.

The company has secured funding from the Australian government’s Commercialization Australia program, and from Tahoma Ventures, Blue Note Ventures and Galvanize Ventures in March 2016.

The team behind section.io aims to give developers of ops and apps teams control over their solution, and make it easy to use. From their own experience they found CDNs to be clunky, and packed with features that do not necessarily fit the needs of developers. They apply the agile DevOps principles to content delivery. Section.io automates the setup process for a Varnish installation and gives clients access and control over the configuration. Their platform platform lets clients run their own Varnish Configuration Language (VCL), both in development and in production.

Included features are logs, alerting, usage statistics and SSL. In addition, section.io supports HTTP/2.

Customers of section.io are, or have been: Mazda, Appliances Online, nib, Temple & Webster, Breville, Intrepid Travel, Lorna Jane, Adairs, Australian Geographic, Booktopia, Colorado and I love ugly.

LEASEWEB Description

LeaseWeb is a global Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider founded in 1997, and a daughter company of OCOM Group. LeaseWeb is a one-stop-shop for a wide range of Internet services such as colocation, cloud hosting, dedicated servers and a CDN solution.

The company is headquartered in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands.

LeaseWeb’s network includes 58 ‘PoPs’ and 6 ’SuperPoPs’. In CDN terms however it is the SuperPoPs that we consider to be the regular points-of-presence as we know them: servers where content is cached. The remaining 58 locations are networking PoPs where a request enters the LeaseWeb network, but no content is cached.

Notable customers of LeaseWeb include Kaspersky Lab, Grundig and Twenga.

LeaseWeb hosts the European hub of the Wikimedia Foundation, as part of a €300,000 gift in kind to the foundation. The company was also one of the hosting providers of Megaupload, and in 2013 wiped 630 of their dedicated servers clean of Megaupload user data. LeaseWeb issued a statement explaining their decision, stating there were no requests to to access or retain the data for over a year, and that the company had been running and maintaining the servers at its own expense. Megaupload’s assets were seized by the U.S. government and it could not pay its hosting partners. Petabytes of data were lost forever, and the act is considered a scandal and a betrayal by Megaupload sympathisers. Megaupload’s main hosting partner Carpathia, decided to keep storing the servers at their own expense. While the Carpathia servers are disconnected and stored, the data so far seems protected from destruction.

Through their Community Outreach Project, LeaseWeb supports organisations that combat cybercrime and spam by offering free hosting services. In 2009 the company ran a pilot for preventive filtering of online child porn in cooperation with Swedish company NetClean, the Dutch Ministry of Justice and the Dutch Child Porn Hotline. While from a technological perspective LeaseWeb was pleased with the outcome, there were still some hurdles to be addressed in cooperation with the Dutch National Police Services Agency.

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